Conference Schedule

Wednesday, November 6

Thursday, November 7

Friday, November 8


Keynote Sessions

Keynote Session 1

Title

How the Growing Population of Students with Mental Health Difficulties Impact on our Programs-and Our Institutions

Speaker

Jane Jarrow, Disability Access Information and Support

Abstract

There is no question but that we are seeing an increasing number of students with significant mental health disabilities at the college level. Whether the rapidly growing number is a function of more students experiencing difficulties, or a function of an atmosphere that encourages more students to ask for help when they need it (or some combination thereof!) isn’t really important to our discussion. The fact is, there are a lot more students requesting support/service in response to their mental health diagnosis.

Routinely, disability service providers are tasked with accepting documentation of mental health difficulties and assigning appropriate accommodations, as we do with/for other students with disabilities. The problem is not just that there are so many more students coming forward with mental health diagnoses. The problem is that there are ramifications throughout the institution of those increased numbers. The increasing presence of students with mental health disabilities is a reality. It is a campus-wide reality, not just an issue for DSS programs. We need to take active steps to acknowledge that reality, and spread the responsibility, as appropriate.

Learning Outcomes

Our two-fold goal is to make it clear that this is not (solely) a disability services confer, and that the needs of these disabled students are best met through the cooperative efforts of campus personnel. Participants will:

  1. help clarify the circumstances in which the increasing population of students may need new or altered consideration
  2. discuss the spreading nature of the problem when traditional responses are no longer universally appropriate to the needs of the student body
  3. focus in on what must occur on your campus, among various stakeholders, to prepare the institution for proactive response to these changing needs

Professional Bio

Jane E. Jarrow, Ph.D. has established a reputation for being knowledgeable and articulate in understanding and presenting the issues of importance related to disability in the higher education arena. She is a prolific author and an acknowledged leader in the field. Her professional involvement in this field spans more than 40 years and includes her long tenure as the Executive Director of the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). Those who have turned to her for technical assistance or who have heard her speak have remarked on Jane's comfortable presentation style, her down-to-earth approach to the subject, her ready availability and willingness to assist, and her ability to relate general legal principles to the specific situations encountered in the postsecondary setting.

In Jane's own words:
"I am not an attorney, and I think that is an advantage in the work that I do. I provide technical assistance, never legal advice, and thus I don't have to couch my statements too carefully. I can—and do—'call 'em as I see 'em' based on my understanding of the law and my extensive experience in the field."

Keynote Session 2

Title

State of the Art: Animals on Campus

Speaker

Jane Jarrow, Disability Access Information and Support

Abstract

For several years, issue of ESAs and Service Animals have been at the forefront of our professional discussions and interchange. While we have heard about the application of Federal law in sorting out issues of animals on campus, the ORAHEAD conference provides a unique opportunity to focus on the how Oregon's state statutes go beyond federal mandates to include the presence of service animals in training ("assistance animal trainees"). More importantly, we need to talk about what is NOT covered under state law!

Learning Outcomes

Participants will:

  1. Learn about how the Oregon state statute(s) regarding animals interact, intertwine -- and conflict with! -- Federal statutes regarding service animals and ESAs
  2. Explore how to use the statements in State statutes to respond to situations with animals on campus including claims of service animals in training, animals refused as ESAs who become service animals in training the following week, requests to serve as puppy raisers for a service animal training agency, and fake claims of protections for service animals and ESAs

Professional Bio

Jane E. Jarrow, Ph.D. has established a reputation for being knowledgeable and articulate in understanding and presenting the issues of importance related to disability in the higher education arena. She is a prolific author and an acknowledged leader in the field. Her professional involvement in this field spans more than 40 years and includes her long tenure as the Executive Director of the Association on Higher Education and Disability (AHEAD). Those who have turned to her for technical assistance or who have heard her speak have remarked on Jane's comfortable presentation style, her down-to-earth approach to the subject, her ready availability and willingness to assist, and her ability to relate general legal principles to the specific situations encountered in the postsecondary setting.

In Jane's own words:
"I am not an attorney, and I think that is an advantage in the work that I do. I provide technical assistance, never legal advice, and thus I don't have to couch my statements too carefully. I can—and do—'call 'em as I see 'em' based on my understanding of the law and my extensive experience in the field."

Full Sessions

Full Session 1

Title

Disability Rights are Civil Rights: Infusing Disability Justice Into Average DS Offices

Speaker

Jen Dugger, Portland State University

Abstract

While disability cultural centers are popping up across the country, many DS professionals struggle with having the resources to consider such an option. This session will explore promising practices and initiatives, using resources you already have to reframe the DS office as a unit for social justice on campus.

Nearly eleven percent (11%) of college students identity as having a disability (National Center for Education Statistics), however both of the presenters’ DS offices boast an enrollment of about six and a half percent (6.5%). Research reflects on some of the barriers that interfere with disabled students self-identifying to the DS office (Marshak, L. et al. 2010). These barriers include (a) identity issues, (b) desires to avoid negative social reactions, (c) insufficient knowledge, (d) perceived quality and usefulness of services, and (e) negative experiences with faculty. It is the presenters’ belief that if DS offices spent more time combating the stigma associated with disability/accommodations by centering social justice, more disabled students would access services and the campus community would become a more welcoming and inclusive place to those with disabilities.

Decades ago, disability services (DS) offices in higher education began out of legal necessity and, to a great extent, the perception of the role of these offices is still the same today. Students understand that they must prove their disabilities are significant before getting access to even the most basic of adjustments. Administrators and faculty across our campuses look to us to tell them what needs to be done and how we need to do it before making anything more accessible. Even the DS professionals themselves oftentimes see their roles as fulfilling compliance-related obligations only.

In addition to the misperception that DS offices do legal compliance work only, there’s also the persistent framing of disability through the medical model that prevents us from connecting with a lot of disabled students who are turned off by such approach. The medical model even makes it more difficult to get faculty and other campus community members to support DS offices in the work since the medical model makes it pretty clear that the issue or difficulty the student is experiencing is their own to deal with and that no one else has any responsibility in removing barriers.

However, intentionally incorporating language like “diversity”, “disability justice”, “universal design”, “barriers to access”, “disability community”, and “equity” into everything from a DS office’s mission statement to communication with a student during an initial appointment can make a huge difference in how the office is perceived, what work is to be done, and by whom.

But the work of the DS office can be even more intentionally social justice oriented. For example, by adding artwork featuring disability justice activists (e.g. Kay Ulanday Barrett, Annie Segarra) or catch phrases that portray a social model approach to disability (e.g. “Disability Rights are Civil Rights”, “The Future is Accessible”), a DS office’s values are clearly aligned with the social or socio-political model. Another way to incorporate this messaging could be by creating buttons or bookmarks, for example, that communicate a move away from focusing on compliance and the medical model. DS Offices can also consider hosting their own educational series of events on topics ranging from disability history to ableism and microaggressions.

There’s so much we can do with the resources we already have at our disposal to remove barriers and we should all be wondering how we can do more to incorporate social justice in the work of our DS offices. The presenter will discuss the initiatives and programs she has undertaken and there will be plenty of time for participants to share their ideas as well.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Participants will leave this session with improved fluency in how to consistently represent disability and accessibility as aspects of diversity and inclusion.
  2. Participants will develop a concrete plan to launch disability programming that is informed by the social model of disability.
  3. Through their participation, attendees will leave this session with an improved insight in the opportunities available to them to influence their campus community in reshaping the disability paradigm.

Professional Bio

Jen Dugger is the Director of the Disability Resource Center at Portland State University. Jen has worked at PSU since 2012 and has been in disability services since 2006. Jen was appointed to the board of the ACLU-Oregon in 2014 and served as the chair of the Equity and Inclusion Committee, and VP for Equity until leaving the board earlier this year. She is also an AHEAD board member and co-chair of the LGBTQA SIG. As a white, nondisabled, cisgender queer woman, Jen understands the gravity of leveraging power and privilege for those less advantaged and does her best to stay connected to and informed by individuals and communities doing anti-oppression work. Jen has conducted trainings and presentations for WAPED and ORAHEAD, EDUCAUSE, Academic Impressions, as well as for the AHEAD organization since 2009. Jen’s work predominantly centers around disability as an aspect of diversity, ableism, power and privilege, equity in disability services specifically, and inclusion/equity within organizations.

Full Session 2

Title

Where ADA and Title IX Meet: Best Practices for Accommodating and Supporting Student Survivors

Speakers

Jennifer Gossett, Oregon Health and Science University
Stephanie McClure, Oregon Health and Science University

Abstract

Disability Services (DS) offices have long been accommodating student survivors, sometimes with the knowledge that the disability is connected to sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or childhood abuse and sometimes without disclosures in documentation or self-report. The national conversation has shifted significantly with the MeToo and Time’s Up movements, and Colleges and Universities have been increasing their capacity to address Title IX related issues since the OCR 2011 Dear Colleague Letter. While DS offices and Title IX coordinators often work together, there is a knowledge gap and a service gap. A recent study found that 22% of college students with disabilities had experienced abuse over the last year and 62% had experienced abuse before the age of 17 (Findley, Plummer, & Mcmahon, 2016). In this same study, 40% of the survivors stated they had little or no knowledge of the abuse-related resources available to them. This presentation will share best practices and case studies for collaboration between DS, a Confidential Advocacy Program, and the Title IX Coordinator with the goal of improving support and outcomes for student survivors.

Reference: Findley, P. A., Plummer, S., & Mcmahon, S. (2016). Exploring the Experiences of Abuse of College Students With Disabilities. Journal of Interpersonal Violence,31(17), 2801-2823. doi:10.1177/0886260515581906

Learning Outcomes
  1. Participants will increase understanding of Interim and Supportive Measures available under Title IX.
  2. Participants will identify where Title IX Interim and Supportive Measures can provide additional benefit to existing accommodation plans.
  3. Participants will build capacity in making appropriate referrals to Title IX Coordinators and/or Confidential Advocacy Programs.

Professional Bios

Jennifer Gossett
Jennifer Gossett is the Director for the Office for Student Access at Oregon Health and Science University. She has worked in Disability Services in a variety of capacities for over 10 years. She began her career in Higher Education as a student para-professional working with new student orientation programs. Jennifer then went on to the Peace Corps, served in Americorps, and worked in Wilderness Therapy before coming back to Higher Education. Jennifer received a Master of Science focused in Educational Leadership and Policy and a Graduate Certificate in Student Affairs Administration from Portland State University in 2010.

Stephanie McClure
Collaborating, envisioning, and creating ways to bring an end to and prevent violence and oppression is Stephanie’s passion. Stephanie utilizes a trauma-informed, survivor-centered, best practice advocacy and violence prevention framework, supported by feminist, critical race, queer, public health, and student development theories and informed by the communities she works with. Her favorite parts of her day include creating intersectional violence, discrimination, and oppression prevention, bystander intervention, peer education, leadership, advocacy, and social justice student leadership programs and curricula that reduce risk factors and provide a protective environment enabling students to develop skills and self-efficacy. Stephanie has an M.A. in Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and her research specializations are in sexual misconduct and violence prevention education and advocacy for college students and Title IX and Clery compliance.

Breakout Sessions

Breakout Session 1

Title

Creating the PSU Tactile Map from One SVG File

Speaker

Michael Cantino, Portland Community College

Abstract

Portland State University worked with its BVI students and Portland Community College to create a large scale, high contrast, 3D tactile map to promote orientation and mobility around the PSU campus. The map shows the orientation of PSU buildings among the busy terrain of downtown Portland, and includes sky bridges, transit lines, street and building labels, open "hardscape" and grass areas, and the relative heights of buildings.

The map is made of laser cut and etched acrylic and wood, 3D printed symbols and labels, vinyl cut grass textures, and a high contrast print layer. All of these were produced using the same SVG source file that was quickly converted from an original PDF. The large scale of the map (approximately 4.5 x 3 feet) required the production to be done in stages, and the use of one SVG file for all the aspects of the map helped maintain the required accuracy–within a fraction of a millimeter–across a spectrum of production methods.

SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics) files can be enlarged infinitely, embossed (with ink and texture!), printed on microcapsule (swell touch) paper, laser cut, vinyl cut, 3D printed, and more! In this session, we will explore the surprisingly easy work of creating and using SVG files for a variety of production methods. There’s a good chance that you are already creating these files in your alternative formats workflow, and you can leverage the flexibility of these files to present your materials in a variety of modes to best support the students, staff, and visitors in your community. An array of materials will be provided for participants to explore, various conventions for production methods will be detailed, and some useful shortcuts will be reviewed to help attendees quickly get started with creating these files.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand where SVG files fit in your alt formats workflow and how one file can be adapted for various production methods.
  2. Learn specific approaches for preparing files for 3D printing, laser cutting, and embossing. Introduction to free software to aid in the creation of and production with SVG files.
  3. Understand available “shortcut” methods for quickly creating SVG files from a source image.
Professional Bio

Michael Cantino is an Accessibility Specialist at Portland Community College and a Student Research Assistant at Portland State University. Before joining PCC in 2017, Michael worked in K-12 special education for 11 years, specializing in supporting students with behavioral challenges, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and students with visual impairments. Michael is a Library of Congress certified braille transcriber and is skilled in the production of tactile graphics and 3D models for visually impaired learners. At PCC, Michael provides a broad range of supports for students experiencing disabilities, with a focus on assistive technology, alternative formats, and in-class supports. In addition to his work at Portland Community College, Michael is also a Student Research Assistant at Portland State University where he is studying the use of interactive 3D models to support visually impaired learners.

Breakout Session 2

Title

Will this Cause a Fundamental Alteration?

Speaker

Jann McCaul, Warner Pacific University

Abstract

The phrase "unless causes undue burden or fundamental alteration" is such a vague concept for Colleges and Disabilities Services Administrators to interpret. Over the years, the concept has changed with the advancements of technology. Yet, it is never quite clear where the line is drawn relative to learning outcomes; how flexible should we be with accommodations versus protecting the integrity of the program. We can explore this by evaluating recent Office of Civil Rights rulings. Some of the most recent rulings involve modified attendance, use of memory aids, accommodations in STEM programs, admission/rejection of students in programs, animals on campus, housing, athletics, and how technology advances have changed captioning and website accessibility requirements.

In addition to looking at the recent rulings, a short list of the potential questions addressed are:

  • Who should make the decision that the accommodation causes an alteration?
  • What types of policies and guidelines can be in place to clarify undue burden or fundamental alteration?
  • How can educators address issues when a requested accommodation alters the program’s learning outcomes or becomes an undue burden?
  • Are there viable technologies that can be useful without fundamentally altering the learning outcomes? Who funds the technologies?
  • How will I know if the accommodation request will fundamentally alter the program?

Learning Outcomes
  1. To develop a better understanding of best practices for Fundamental Alterations
  2. Explore various legal rulings pertaining to Fundamental Alterations
  3. Learn when Fundamental Alterations is not an option
Professional Bio

Jann is the Coordinator for the Disabilities Resources Center at Warner Pacific University. She earned her Masters degree from Concordia University in Portland, as well as a Bachelor's of Art degree in Psychology from Reed College. She worked in the fields of Workers Compensation and Personal Injury for over 15 years as a legal assistant, plus worked in disability services for higher education at several colleges since 2001.

Breakout Session 3

Title

A Beginner’s Guide to Braille Formats

Speaker

Michael Cantino, Portland Community College

Abstract

The formatting of print plays an integral part in how we consume and make sense of a document, but too often these formatting conventions are completely absent from hard copy braille documents. As a result, braille readers must slog through unwieldy blobs of text without clear paragraphs, lists, break out boxes, headings, or page numbers. Worse, they may receive materials that omit important information (like numbered lines in poetry), are nearly unusable (like auto-formatted tables), or be asked to interpret ad hoc formatting conventions devised by untrained staff. Producing unformatted braille may be technically compliant, but is it ethically compliant?

Fortunately, there is a better way! The Braille Authority of North America (BANA) has worked with braille consumers and transcribers over many years to devise an exhaustive guide for formatting braille documents. In this session, we will explore the most recent edition of the BANA Braille Formats and apply its guidance to the most common braille formatting needs and challenges. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of braille translation software, and follow a step-by-step process for preparing properly formatted braille documents. This session will focus on the use of Duxbury Translation Software and its SWIFT add-in for Microsoft Word to quickly apply the necessary formats, but the concepts can be applied to any braille translation software.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Understand the importance of properly formatted braille and the consequences of receiving unformatted braille.
  2. Learn key components and conventions that should be included in every braille document. Understand common formatting challenges and how to address them using the BANA guidelines.
  3. Introduction to Duxbury’s SWIFT add-in for Word to quickly create properly formatted braille documents.
Professional Bio

Michael Cantino is an Accessibility Specialist at Portland Community College and a Student Research Assistant at Portland State University. Before joining PCC in 2017, Michael worked in K-12 special education for 11 years, specializing in supporting students with behavioral challenges, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and students with visual impairments. Michael is a Library of Congress certified braille transcriber and is skilled in the production of tactile graphics and 3D models for visually impaired learners. At PCC, Michael provides a broad range of supports for students experiencing disabilities, with a focus on assistive technology, alternative formats, and in-class supports. In addition to his work at Portland Community College, Michael is also a Student Research Assistant at Portland State University where he is studying the use of interactive 3D models to support visually impaired learners.

Breakout Session 4

Title

ESOL: Partnerships, The Refugee Experience and Universal Design

Speaker

Sara Packer, Portland Community College
Doree Dennis, Portland Community College
Phyllis Petteys, Portland Community College
Kari Hanken, Portland Community College

Abstract

Disability affects ESOL students at higher rates than the college population, yet fewer than 1% connect with Disability Services at PCC. In this session, we will discuss reasons for this statistic. We will also discuss our work with ESOL students with disabilities who immigrated to the US as refugees and have successfully completed college degrees. They have helped us to better understand the refugee experience for all students, and this information has been integral to our partnership with ESOL instructors. We will share how we have collaborated with ESOL instructors to incorporate Universal Design—for example we trained ESOL students and faculty on TTS software and discussed accessibility. At the same time, ESOL instructors incorporated disability into their curriculum, and invited us to participate in their classes to discuss disability. We have also been asked to help review possible books for classes. This collaborative group has had many “aha moments” about intersectionality and the need for flexibility with ESOL students. In our work together, we consult often with former ESOL students—these conversations give rise to Universal Design solutions and a greater understanding of the immigrant and refugee populations--especially those with disabilities. We will share how these relationships have broadened our perspective (as DS professionals) and has created a space for ongoing work together.

Learning Outcomes
  1. Examine the reason why students in ESOL classes do not tend to seek services with Disability Services.
  2. Recognize how Universal Design has many applications to students in ESOL classes and how this can be generalized to all classes.
  3. Discuss the benefits of learning from faculty and how that has informed our thinking and work with other groups on campus such as Adult Basic Ed and Developmental Education
  4. Learn about activities and projects we have done together, and how exciting and interesting opportunities continue to come up organically as we work together

Professional Bio

Sara Packer
I have been teaching ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) at Portland Community College for 15 years, at all levels from beginners to advanced. I have been active during my whole adult life in raising diversity awareness for myself and others in the areas of racism, sexism, ageism, and homophobia. I have participated in the joint ESOL / Disability Services Committee at PCC for the past two years, in an effort to educate instructors about the possible challenges faced by students in their classes and to encourage more students, especially ESOL students, to seek out the assistance they might need to be optimally successful in their studies.

Doree Dennis
I have been teaching ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) for over 20 years and twelve of those years at Portland Community College. I have taught all levels of ESOL learners, beginners to advanced, who are immigrants, refugees, and international students. I am currently on the joint ESOL/Disability Services Committee at PCC, and in an intermediate-level reading class, I co-piloted a graphic novel memoir about a woman's experience growing up with hearing loss. This novel was chosen to open a dialogue about inclusiveness and social justice in relation to disability and also to encourage students, ESOL students in particular, to be aware of and seek out assistance from Disability Services at PCC as needed.

Phyllis Petteys
Phyllis is an Accessibility Specialist for Disability Services at Portland Community College in Portland, OR. Prior to coming to PCC in 2013, she was an Assistive Technology Specialist for 18 years, working in higher education as well as in the community.

Kari Hanken
I have worked at PCC as a Disability Counselor for over 20 years. In the last two years, I've been working collaboratively with ESOL and our DS department on a variety of activities to promote Universal Design, to make connections with students and to strengthen partnerships in our departments. This last year I co-presented several sessions at the ORTESOL conference. Outside of work, I have had the opportunity to volunteer with many Portland refugees from around the world in the past 20 years.

Breakout Session 5

Title

Empowering Creative Minds: A Strengths-Based Approach to Supporting Students with ADHD

Speaker

Kelsey Kuperman, University of Oregon

Abstract

The term “Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder,” or “ADHD,” has gained buzzword status across academic settings in recent years. Further, a large portion of providers work directly with students with diagnosed with ADHD (many of whom might even have ADHD themselves!). Even still, the reality is that most people – even those of us carrying around an ADHD diagnosis – have not yet fully grasped an understanding of what it actually means (and feels like) to have ADHD. Through this engaging and interactive presentation, we will first take a quick peek into the ADHD brain to briefly explore ADHD as a form of neurodiversity and to discuss how these brain differences can show up as strengths (creativity, curiosity, passion, “hyper-focusing”) and frustrating challenges (lack of motivation, difficulty getting started, trouble tracking time) for individuals with ADHD. Throughout the presentation, we will discuss real-life examples of what it looks and feels like to navigate college with ADHD. Further, a large portion of the workshop will cover a range of strategies for students to try out, many of which are designed to build off of their inherit ADHD-related strengths, as well as specific strategies to better equip educators and providers with the tools necessary to effectively support students with ADHD in their academic journeys. The presentation’s three primary learning objectives include: (a) gaining deeper insight into the ADHD experience through a more informed, strengths-based lens, (b) learning creative strategies that may be particularly useful for students with ADHD, and (c) increasing knowledge of helpful tools and strategies for effectively supporting students with ADHD.

Learning Outcomes
  1. gaining deeper insight into the ADHD experience through a more informed, strengths-based lens
  2. learning creative strategies that may be particularly useful for students with ADHD
  3. increasing knowledge of helpful tools and strategies for effectively supporting students with ADHD

Professional Bio

Born and raised in Atlanta, Georgia, Kelsey Kuperman is a fifth-year doctoral student in the Counseling Psychology PhD program at the University of Oregon. Kelsey has gained local and international experience providing therapy and community-based mental health services to adults, children, and Spanish-speaking families. Since 2016, Kelsey has worked at the UO Accessible Education Center as an Ongoing Support Counselor, where she provides weekly academic and mental health services for students with disabilities. Her passions around ADHD and years of personal and professional experience in the field led her to design and facilitate a weekly ADHD psychoeducational support group for students. Kelsey also conducts workshops aimed at increasing awareness of disability justice issues and providing insight into the ADHD experience through a strengths-based lens. She plans to build upon this work to help break down disability-related stigma and promote more inclusive learning environments and therapeutic experiences for individuals with disabilities.

Breakout Session 6

Title

Who Am I To Stop It: Discussion About Understanding Students with Brain Injuries

Speaker

Cheryl Green, Independent Filmmaker
Phyllis Petteys, Portland Community College

Abstract

Join us for a conversation with Cheryl Green award-winning filmmaker and person with a brain injury. Cheryl will show parts of her film, Who Am I To Stop It, which follows three artists with brain injuries as they navigate work, school, relationships, and identity. The focus of the film is on the whole person, as opposed to more narrow, medically influenced portrayals often found in films about people who have experienced trauma. As professionals in disability in higher education, these examples can remind us of the struggles students and co-workers encounter day-to-day. The film contains audio description (as well as captions) and was filmed in the Northwest.

Learning Outcomes
  1. View examples of non-medical personal narratives from people with brain injuries -- Dani, Kris and Brandon from the film
  2. How to educate your community about brain injury and encourage dialogues.
  3. Discussion on how we can better support students with brain injuries.
  4. Recognize the complex intersectionality of identities and their impact on daily life.

Professional Bio

Cheryl Green
Cheryl Green, MFA, MS integrates her training in Performance As Public Practice and Speech-Language Pathology to explore how story can be used to address bias and break down barriers. She is a multimedia digital artist, captioner, audio describer, a 2017 AIR New Voices Scholar, and a member-owner at New Day Films. She brings her lived experience with multiple invisible disabilities to creating media that explores politically- and culturally-engaged stories from cross-disability communities. Her blog, podcast, and documentary films are at www.WhoAmIToStopIt.com.

Phyllis Petteys
Phyllis is an Accessibility Specialist for Disability Services at Portland Community College in Portland, OR. Prior to coming to PCC in 2013, she was an Assistive Technology Specialist for 18 years, working in higher education as well as in the community.